Velocity Learn: A take a look at the 2024 Triumph Daytona 660 and extra


The latest motorcycle news and custom bikes
Our first Velocity Learn of the 12 months has one thing for everybody. We kick off with information of the brand new Triumph Daytona 660, then profile a pointy Honda CB450 café racer from the US. A classic Triumph from Heiwa MC and a cheeky Yamaha TW200 from Deus take us residence.

2024 Triumph Daytona 660
Triumph Daytona 660 Followers of the sensible Triumph Daytona have been handled to excellent news this week, because the British marque introduced the return of the Daytona identify to its line-up… with one main caveat. Formally named the Triumph Daytona 660, the brand new middleweight sportbike is predicated on the Trident 660 roadster, and never the outstanding Avenue Triple 765.

To be truthful, the Daytona 660 is way more than only a Trident 660 with fairings. Triumph has improved the 660 cc triple-cylinder mill, pushing its energy output to 95 hp and torque to 69 Nm. It hits peak energy at 11,250 rpm, redlines at 12,650 rpm, and has over 80 % of its torque accessible from 3,125 rpm.

2024 Triumph Daytona 660
The Daytona 660’s body is totally different from the Trident’s too, possible tweaked with classes discovered from the event of Triumph’s Moto2 prototype. 41 mm big-piston Showa forks sit up entrance, with a preload-adjustable Showa mono-shock out again. The Daytona 660 borrows its 17” wheels from the Avenue Triple 765 RS, with two four-piston brake calipers up entrance and a single disc brake out again.

Visually, the brand new Daytona 660 strikes an excellent stability between the look of Triumph’s present crop of roadsters and the sporty however restrained vibe of the earlier Daytona. It will get a full fairing with fairing-mounted mirrors, clip-ons, rear-set pegs, and break up saddles with an 810 mm seat top for the rider. It additionally will get a model new exhaust that appears equivalent to the Trident 660’s exhaust, however is seemingly totally different.

2024 Triumph Daytona 660
The Daytona 660’s electronics bundle is commonplace Triumph fare. You get three switchable rider modes, traction management, and ABS, with a quick-shifter accessible as an elective further. LED lighting and a novel TFT show spherical out the bundle.

What the Daytona 660 doesn’t have, is the engine, energy and torque figures, fully-adjustable Showa forks and Öhlins rear shock, and top-shelf Brembo brakes of the Avenue Triple 765 RS. Triumph is touting the brand new Daytona 660 as a “finest in school” providing, but it surely’s arduous to not pine for the Avenue Triple’s efficiency. As a result of whereas the Trident 660 is a superb bike, the Avenue Triple 765 RS is an distinctive bike.

2024 Triumph Daytona 660
Whereas the 2024 TriumphDaytona 660 seems adequate on paper, it is likely to be too vanilla for die-hard followers of the Daytona. We sincerely hope {that a} Daytona 765 is ready within the wings—and whether it is, we’re questioning why it didn’t break cowl first. [Triumph Motorcycles]

Honda CB450 café racer by Mile Zero
Honda CB450 by Mile Zero Racers Primarily based in Rochester, New York, Thomas Manno has solely constructed two bikes below the banner of Mile Zero Racers—however he’s already established a signature model. Each bikes are Honda CB café racers, and each seem like they have been constructed as a lot for velocity as for model. However there’s additionally a deeper connection…

The primary bike is a Honda CB750 that Thomas began engaged on two years in the past. Throughout that undertaking, his brother purchased a Honda CB450 for Thomas to journey round on whereas the CB750 was on the bench. As soon as the CB750 was finished, Thomas labored his magic on the CB450—after which gave it again to his brother for his thirtieth birthday.

Honda CB450 café racer by Mile Zero
“The thought of this bike was to utterly change the attitude of what’s attainable for the CB450 platform,” says Thomas. “I set the bar excessive with the earlier CB750 construct, so it was my mission to push the boundaries of my skills and make the 450 construct an entire problem. Which means pushing myself to finish the construct with largely all the things made in-house, relatively than bought off the shelf.”

Honda CB450 café racer by Mile Zero
The CB450’s engine was wholesome for its age, so all it wanted was a brand new set of gaskets and an exterior refresh. It now inhales by way of a pair of velocity stacks with mesh covers and exhales through a custom-made exhaust system that snakes its method by way of a home made stomach pan. One other native workshop, The Motoworks, equipped the flip indicators, headlight, mirror, and rear-sets, plus a management unit to rewire the bike with.

The Motoworks additionally despatched over a {custom} entrance hub and new yokes, in order that Thomas may improve the front-end with a set of Suzuki GSX-R forks and brakes. Subsequent, Thomas transformed the rear finish from a dual- to single-shock association. Each wheels have been re-laced with recent Warp 9 rims.

Honda CB450 café racer by Mile Zero
As for the bodywork, a Honda CB200 gasoline tank sits up prime, fettled to suit on the CB450’s body. Thomas modified the subframe for a tighter kicked-up impact, then constructed a carbon fiber tail bump, mixing basic café racer model with fashionable supplies. Look intently, and also you’ll spot that the headlight bucket can also be carbon fiber.

The upholstery is especially fashionable; a perforated design that continues up and over the gasoline tank. Raised clip-ons adorn the cockpit, together with recent grips, bar-end mirrors, and an aftermarket speedo. An excellent wine-red livery provides the proper crowning glory. [Mile Zero Racers]

Vintage Triumph TR6 by Heiwa MC
Triumph TR6 by Heiwa MC Tapered gasoline tanks, stepped tail cowls, slender handlebars—there’s an magnificence to Kengo Kimura’s signature classic Triumph builds that’s arduous to place into phrases. However when you look past the handcrafted bodywork and luscious paint, every bike has a wealth of distinctive particulars to soak up.

This 1970-model Triumph TR6 is a main instance of the kind of work that put Kimura-san’s store, Heiwa MC, on the map.

Vintage Triumph TR6 by Heiwa MC
Kengo’s hand is obvious within the {custom} gasoline tank, tail cowl, and aspect covers. However eager eyes will discover that the body can also be bespoke, as is the mono-shock swingarm. (The shock is difficult to identify as a result of it’s hidden away by a handcrafted oil tank).

The aspect covers kind a part of the air cleaner setup, directing air to the Mikuni VM32 carbs. Excessive-mounted exhaust headers make noise through a pair of stacked reverse cone mufflers.

Vintage Triumph TR6 by Heiwa MC
A set of Kayaba forks sit up entrance, stabilized by a custom-made fork brace. The TR6 rolls on 19F/18R wheels, with a Robinson twin main shoe drum brake hub up entrance. Kengo additionally fabricated the handlebars, controls, footpegs, headlight cowl, and taillight.

Take a peek across the left aspect of the bike, and also you’ll spot its most unusual characteristic. Kengo transformed the first drive to a belt system, protected by {a partially} open three-piece cowl.

Vintage Triumph TR6 by Heiwa MC
Then there’s the paint job—a charming mixture of olive inexperienced metallic and darkish inexperienced metallic, separated by silver leaf striping. Executed by Shakin’ Speedgraphix, it’s a livery worthy of Kengo’s handiwork. [Heiwa MC | Images by Kazuo Matsumoto]

Yamaha TW200 scrambler by Deus ex Machina
Yamaha TW200 by Deus ex Machina The TW200 and XT500 are two of essentially the most cherished bikes that Yamaha ever produced. So what higher solution to have fun their respective legacies, than by rolling all of their model into one feisty {custom} bike? Meet the Deus XTW200; a Yamaha TW200 that’s been custom-made to seem like the fat-tired, beach-cruising little brother that the XT500 by no means had.

The XTW200 is the work of Jeremy Tagand at Deus ex Machina’s Sydney store. The undertaking began as a real barn discover—a uncared for TW200 with a thrashed engine, in dire want of affection. Deus put the engine by way of a full rebuild, then added a Keihin FCR carburetor and a custom-made exhaust with a Supertrapp muffler.

Yamaha TW200 scrambler by Deus ex Machina
The body was tidied up too, after which powder-coated in satin black. Each final nut and bolt was both zinc coated or changed, and the beforehand lengthened swingarm was introduced again to a extra affordable size. A brand new set of YSS shocks prop up the rear, whereas the OEM entrance forks have been refurbished with recent internals.

Deus additionally rebuilt the wheels with new rims and spokes, ending them in ceramic-coated champagne gold as a nod to the XT500s of the late 70s and early 80s.

Yamaha TW200 scrambler by Deus ex Machina
An alloy trackmaster-style gasoline tank sits up prime, completed within the iconic early-80s XT500 scheme. A classic motocross-style seat sits behind it, upholstered in gripper vinyl and Alcantara. Refined touches embrace the XT500-inspired ‘TW200’ tank logos, branding that’s been stitched into the seat, and a hidden rear splash guard.

The cockpit sports activities a set of extensive ProTaper flat monitor handlebars, fitted with Motogadget grips, and a throttle and switches from Messner Moto. The chunky bar pad has been modified to host a Motogadget speedo and LED warning gentle strip. A Highsider headlight pokes out the entrance, with Kellermann flip indicators to maintain issues street-friendly.

Yamaha TW200 scrambler by Deus ex Machina
A shortened seat was sourced from Japan after which re-foamed for a extra VMX form and adorned in gripper vinyl and Alcantara, accented by the crimson stitching and branding within the rear. An alloy trackmaster-style tank sporting the notorious, early 80’s XT500 color scheme and graphics was perched atop the refurbed body.

Within the cockpit, a set of Protaper EVO tracker bars maintain the Motogadget Motoscope Mini and Mo.signal recessed into the bar pad- Which can also be handsomely dressed within the gripper materials from the seat. Messner Moto throttle and switches and Motogadget grips end off the bars completely.

Yamaha TW200 scrambler by Deus ex Machina
Deus has all the time celebrated the intersection of motorcycling and browsing, so it’s solely becoming that this Yamaha TW200 has room for a surfboard. With a Supertrapp silencer slung below the bike, it needs to be simply rowdy sufficient to pique the curiosity of your native beachgoers as you trundle right down to the seaside. [Deus Customs | Images by Chris Grundy]

Yamaha TW200 scrambler by Deus ex Machina